Antioxidants

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The threat of free radicals

Cells are continually under attack from compounds called 'free radicals'. Generated as a 'by-product' of the body's own metabolism or as a result of external factors like pollution, free radicals can kill cells by damaging the membrane, the enzymes and the DNA contained within. Free radicals pose a particular risk to the cells of the nervous and immune systems, and they are even thought to contribute to the progression of many diseases and the onset of premature ageing.

How antioxidants help

Antioxidants help prevent the free radicals from damaging cells. Whilst the body's normal antioxidant defenses provide some protection, the addition of antioxidants to the diet provides an additional 'active shield' that supports those natural defenses.

Clinically proven antioxidants

Hill's pet foods contain a unique combination of antioxidants such as vitamins E and C, beta-carotene and selenium, and that superior antioxidant formula has been clinically proven to help maintain your pet's health, reduce the risk of disease and strengthen the immune response.

Protecting puppies and kittens

Because puppies and kittens are particularly at risk from free radicals, Hill's pet foods contain antioxidants clinically proven to help build healthy immune systems right from the start.

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