Thank you for visiting

To log out and end your session, click "OK"


Science Diet - Vet's #1 Choice for Their Own Pets


Share this page Send this pagePrint

Affenpinscher |  Afghan Hound |  Airedale Terrier |  Akbash Dog |  Akita |  Alaskan Klee Kai |  American Eskimo |  American Pit Bull Terrier |  American Staffordshire Terrier |  American Water Spaniel |  Australian Cattle Dog |  Australian Shepherd |  Basenji |  Basset Hound |  Beagle |  Bearded Collie |  Beauceron |  Bedlington Terrier |  Belgian Malinois |  Belgian Sheepdog |  Bernese Mountain Dog |  Bichon Frise |  Black and Tan Coonhound |  Bloodhound |  Border Collie |  Border Terrier |  Borzoi |  Boston Terrier |  Bouvier des Flandres |  Boxer |  Boykin Spaniel |  Briard |  Brittany |  Brussels Griffon |  Bullmastiff |  Bull Terrier |  Cairn Terrier |  Canadian Eskimo |  Cavalier King Charles Spaniel |  Chesapeake Bay Retriever |  Chihuahua |  Chinese Crested |  Chinook |  Chow Chow |  Clumber Spaniel |  Cocker Spaniel |  Collie or Scottish Collie |  Curly-Coated Retriever |  Dachshund |  Dalmatian |  Dandie Dinmont Terrier |  Doberman |  English Bulldog |  English Cocker Spaniel |  English Foxhound |  English Pointer |  English Setter |  English Springer Spaniel |  Field Spaniel |  Finnish Spitz |  Flat-Coated Retriever |  French Bulldog |  German Shepherd |  German Shorthaired Pointer |  German Wirehaired Pointer |  Giant Schnauzer |  Golden Retriever |  Great Dane |  Great Pyrenees |  Greyhound |  Havanese |  Ibizan Hound |  Irish Setter |  Irish Water Spaniel |  Irish Wolfhound |  Italian Greyhound |  Jack Russell Terrier |  Japanese Chin |  Keeshond |  Komondor |  Kuvasz |  Labrador Retriever |  Leonberger |  Lhasa Apso |  Maltese |  Mastiff |  Miniature Bull Terrier |  Miniature Pinscher |  Miniature Schnauzer |  Newfoundland |  Norfolk Terrier |  Norwegian Elkhound |  Norwich Terrier |  Old English Sheepdog |  Papillon |  Pekingese |  Pharaoh Hound |  Pomeranian |  Poodles |  Portuguese Water Dog |  Pug |  Puli |  Rhodesian Ridgeback |  Rottweiler |  Saint Bernard |  Saluki |  Samoyed |  Schipperke |  Scottish Deerhound |  Scottish Terrier |  Shetland Sheepdog |  Shih Tzu |  Siberian Husky |  Silky Terrier |  Skye Terrier |  Smooth Fox Terrier |  Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier |  Staffordshire Bull Terrier |  Standard Schnauzer |  Vizsla |  Weimaraner |  Welsh Corgi Cardigan |  Welsh Corgi Pembroke |  Welsh Springer Spaniel |  West Highland White Terrier |  Whippet |  Wire Fox Terrier |  Xolotzcuintli |  Yorkshire Terrier

Sensitive, intelligent, responsive and affectionate, the Japanese chin is reputed as the ideal pet by those familiar with the breed. It is dignified yet silly and thrives in any environment.

     Japanese Chin At a glance

Size:

Weight Range:

Male: 4-12 lbs.
Female: 4-12 lbs.

Height at Withers:

Male: 10

Female: 9

Features:

Brachycephalic (squashed face), floppy ears (naturally)

Expectations:

Exercise Requirements: 20 minutes/day
Energy Level: Average
Longevity Range: 12-14 yrs.
Tendency to Drool: Low Tendency to Snore: High
Tendency to Bark: Low
Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High

Bred For:

Lapdog

Coat:

Length: Medium
Characteristics: Straight
Colors: Red and white, black and white with tan points
Overall Grooming Needs: Moderate

Club Recognition:

AKC Classification: Toy
UKC Classification: Companion Dog
Prevalence: So-so


The Japanese Chin Dog Breed

It is suspected that British breeders crossbred the Japanese chin with the King Charles spaniel, resulting in the similarity in appearance.

The Japanese chin has a bright and intelligent look and a distinct Oriental expression. These dogs have a large broad head, large wide-set eyes, short broad muzzle, ear feathering and the evenly patterned facial markings. This toy breed ranges in weight from four to 11 pounds and in height from nine to 10 inches.

The color of the chin is either black and white, red and white, or black and white with tan points. The term tan points includes tan or red spots over each eye, inside the ears, on both cheeks and at the anal vent area if any black is displayed. The term red includes all shades of red, orange, lemon and sable, which includes any aforementioned shade intermingled or overlaid with black.

It is suspected that British breeders probably crossbred the chin with the King Charles spaniel, and that accounts for the similarity in their appearance.

Personality:

A Japanese chin is a good companion. He is a sensitive and intelligent dog, albeit somewhat independent, whose only purpose is to serve as a companion. Responsive and affectionate with those he knows and loves, he is reserved with strangers or in new situations. Naturally clean, the feisty chin makes an ideal pet that can thrive in any environment.

Living With:

Those who know this breed will never again live without one. Japanese chins exemplify everything that is ideal in a pet. They are elegant yet comical, dignified yet silly. Their thick, luxuriant coat requires little care. The chin makes a perfect companion.

History:

The Japanese chin is an old toy breed that most likely evolved from the Tibetan spaniel. Dogs similar in appearance to the chin have been found on ancient pottery and old Chinese temples. The dogs appear to have originated in China. It is reported that the Chinese Emperor gave a pair of chin to the Japanese Emperor. The first European records of the chin go back to the 1600s when Portuguese sailors presented Princess Catherine of Braganza with some chins as a gift. In 1853, Admiral Commodore Perry gave Queen Victoria a pair of chin after his warships visited Japan. World War I and Japanese earthquakes diminished the numbers of chin in Japan.

No firm records exist as to when the chin first appeared in the United States. When they were first recognized in the States, they were called Japanese spaniels. In 1977, the American Kennel Club recognized them as the Japanese chin.