Thank you for visiting

To log out and end your session, click "OK"


Science Diet - Vet's #1 Choice for Their Own Pets


Share this page Send this pagePrint

Affenpinscher |  Afghan Hound |  Airedale Terrier |  Akbash Dog |  Akita |  Alaskan Klee Kai |  American Eskimo |  American Pit Bull Terrier |  American Staffordshire Terrier |  American Water Spaniel |  Australian Cattle Dog |  Australian Shepherd |  Basenji |  Basset Hound |  Beagle |  Bearded Collie |  Beauceron |  Bedlington Terrier |  Belgian Malinois |  Belgian Sheepdog |  Bernese Mountain Dog |  Bichon Frise |  Black and Tan Coonhound |  Bloodhound |  Border Collie |  Border Terrier |  Borzoi |  Boston Terrier |  Bouvier des Flandres |  Boxer |  Boykin Spaniel |  Briard |  Brittany |  Brussels Griffon |  Bullmastiff |  Bull Terrier |  Cairn Terrier |  Canadian Eskimo |  Cavalier King Charles Spaniel |  Chesapeake Bay Retriever |  Chihuahua |  Chinese Crested |  Chinook |  Chow Chow |  Clumber Spaniel |  Cocker Spaniel |  Collie or Scottish Collie |  Curly-Coated Retriever |  Dachshund |  Dalmatian |  Dandie Dinmont Terrier |  Doberman |  English Bulldog |  English Cocker Spaniel |  English Foxhound |  English Pointer |  English Setter |  English Springer Spaniel |  Field Spaniel |  Finnish Spitz |  Flat-Coated Retriever |  French Bulldog |  German Shepherd |  German Shorthaired Pointer |  German Wirehaired Pointer |  Giant Schnauzer |  Golden Retriever |  Great Dane |  Great Pyrenees |  Greyhound |  Havanese |  Ibizan Hound |  Irish Setter |  Irish Water Spaniel |  Irish Wolfhound |  Italian Greyhound |  Jack Russell Terrier |  Japanese Chin |  Keeshond |  Komondor |  Kuvasz |  Labrador Retriever |  Leonberger |  Lhasa Apso |  Maltese |  Mastiff |  Miniature Bull Terrier |  Miniature Pinscher |  Miniature Schnauzer |  Newfoundland |  Norfolk Terrier |  Norwegian Elkhound |  Norwich Terrier |  Old English Sheepdog |  Papillon |  Pekingese |  Pharaoh Hound |  Pomeranian |  Poodles |  Portuguese Water Dog |  Pug |  Puli |  Rhodesian Ridgeback |  Rottweiler |  Saint Bernard |  Saluki |  Samoyed |  Schipperke |  Scottish Deerhound |  Scottish Terrier |  Shetland Sheepdog |  Shih Tzu |  Siberian Husky |  Silky Terrier |  Skye Terrier |  Smooth Fox Terrier |  Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier |  Staffordshire Bull Terrier |  Standard Schnauzer |  Vizsla |  Weimaraner |  Welsh Corgi Cardigan |  Welsh Corgi Pembroke |  Welsh Springer Spaniel |  West Highland White Terrier |  Whippet |  Wire Fox Terrier |  Xolotzcuintli |  Yorkshire Terrier

A friendly, energetic dog, the Brittany is best suited to a home with an active owner who will take time to train and hunt with the dog.

     Brittany At a glance

Size:

Weight Range:

Male: 30-40 lbs.
Female: 30-40 lbs.

Height at Withers:

Male: 19 in.

Female: 18 in.

Features:

Floppy ears (naturally)

Expectations:

Exercise Requirements: >40 minutes/day
Energy Level: Very energetic
Longevity Range: 12-13 yrs.
Tendency to Drool: Low Tendency to Snore: Low
Tendency to Bark: moderate to high
Tendency to Dig: Low Social/Attention Needs: High

Bred For:

Pointing, retrieving

Coat:

Length: Medium
Characteristics: Wavy
Colors: Orange and white, liver and white, tri-colored
Overall Grooming Needs: Moderate

Club Recognition:

AKC Classification: Sporting
UKC Classification: Gun Dog
Prevalence: Common


The Brittany Dog Breed

The Brittany can be restless and prone to excessive barking or roaming. Early obedience, socialization and daily exercise are a must.

The Brittany is a compact dog of medium build.

They are leggy in appearance and are built for great agility and stamina. This build gives the Brittany the ability to cover large amounts of ground quickly. The breed has either a docked tail or is without a tail. The Brittany stands between 17 and 20 inches and weighs 30 to 40 pounds (13 to 18 kilograms). The double coat of the Brittany is dense, and either flat or wavy. The coat is designed not to absorb or hold water or dirt. The coat comes in a variety of colors-orange and white, liver and white, black and white, and some tri-color.

Personality:

The Brittany is a friendly, bright dog who is full of energy. His sweet disposition is good for children and he usually does not mind some roughhousing. Eager to please, Brittanys enjoy being taught basic obedience and they are quick learners.

They are best suited to a home with an active owner who will take time to train and hunt with the dog. The Brittany should at least have a fenced yard to run in. They can be restless and may be prone to excessive barking or roaming. Early obedience, socialization and daily exercise are a must.

Living With:

The Brittany is a high-energy dog who will need daily exercise. This breed is best suited to an active family, one that will channel the dog's desire to hunt and exercise. Homes with a fenced yard or lots of land are best. As with many energetic breeds, if left on its own too often the Brittany may become bored and can be prone to barking, roaming, or other destructive behavior.

The Brittany requires weekly brushing of their coat to remove excess hair and dirt. The breed will shed somewhat year round, with heavier periods in the warmer months. The Brittany is an intelligent breed, easy to train and very sociable. They are generally good with other pets and pleasant with visitors in the home. Brittanys love people and will be happiest when they are allowed to be in the house with their family.

History:

Legend has it that the first ancestor of the modern Brittany was bred about the mid-1800s in a town in the Valley of Douron. The dogs of Brittany and Wales likely had the same ancestors, and today's Welsh Springer and Brittany share many similar physical characteristics.

The Brittany is named for the French province from which it originates. Originally the breed was registered as the Brittany spaniel. The breed combines many talents such as pointing like a setter, and retrieving like a spaniel. In 1982 the breed gave up its classification as a spaniel, and its official American Kennel Club name was changed to Brittany. The Brittany is classified as a utility gun dog, which means they hunt, point, flush and retrieve game. They are the smallest of the breeds known as the versatile gun dogs.