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Science Diet - Vet's #1 Choice for Their Own Pets


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A beautiful cat, the Oriental is also highly intelligent and requires an owner who will return this breed’s trademark dedication.

     Oriental At a glance

Weight range:

Male: medium: 8-12 lbs.
Female: small: <8 lbs.

Eye color:

Blue, Green, Odd-eyed

Expectations:

Longevity Range: 8-12 yrs.
Social/Attention Needs: Moderate
Tendency to Shed: Moderate, High

Coat:

Length: Medium
Characteristics: Smooth, Straight
Colors: White, Blue, Ebony, Cream, Red, Brown, Frost, Platinum, Fawn, Chocolate, Chestnut, Cinnamon, Lavender, Champagne, Seal
Pattern: Solid Color, Tortoiseshell, Bicolor, Tricolor/Calico, Tabby, Ticking, Smoke, Shaded, Points
Less Allergenic: No
Overall Grooming Needs: Moderate, High

Club recognition:

Cat Association Recognition:
CFA, ACFA , FIFe, TICA
Prevalence: Rare


The Oriental Cat Breed

The Oriental is a cat of extremes with a long head, tall ears and long, slender legs.

The Oriental is a long, elegant cat. The body, neck, legs and tail are long. The cat is medium sized but nicely muscled.

The Oriental is a cat of extremes. The head is a long triangle. The tall ears are set to be a continuation of this triangle. The nose is long and straight. The legs are long and slender. The tail is long and tapers to a point. The eyes are almond shape and are usually a bright green. White Orientals may have blue, green, or odd eyes. The pointed Oriental has blue eyes.

The Oriental shorthair coat is short, glossy and lies close to the body. The longhair variant has a medium length coat rather than a full, flowing coat.

Personality:

The Oriental cat is not only beautiful but also is highly intelligent. He can be trained to walk on a lead. This does not mean, however, that he can be trained to do everything you might wish. Like most other highly intelligent breeds, the Oriental has his own desires.

The Oriental is an affectionate cat and requires his owner to be as dedicated to him as he is to his owner. The owner must be affectionate to the Oriental and must spend some time spent playing with him.

Living With:

Owners can tell when the Oriental gains weight. Oriental cats show a pot belly even after indulging in one day of over eating. The nutrition must be carefully controlled for this breed. The long, slim legs are not made to hold a fat body.

Orientals are great jumpers and love heights. For this reason, perches and cat trees should be provided. Oriental cats love to play and appreciate toys around the house for their pleasure. While the coat needs little care, the Oriental Shorthair associates brushing with affection and will enjoy being groomed.

As elegant as the Oriental looks, he can be quite a lap cat. He is extremely affectionate and will sleep next to his owner in bed.

History:

In the 1910s and 1920s in Britain, the Siamese cat was extremely popular. Part of the attraction was the unusual color restriction or pointing. Because of this coloring, breeders determined that all solid colors should be excluded from this breed. The name "foreign shorthair" was given to the first solid color Siamese cats. These cats, which had a myriad of colors and patterns, are now known under the breed name Oriental.

The Oriental is essentially a Siamese cat with a different coat color. A breeding program of Orientals may produce some cats that carry the color restricted pattern of the Siamese, but they are still considered Orientals.

Over time Orientals produced some longhair kittens. These are now recognized as a separate breed called the Oriental longhair. The Oriental longhairs are much less common than are Orientals with short hair.