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Science Diet - Vet's #1 Choice for Their Own Pets


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A fairly placid cat, the affectionate and sweet Burmilla is easy to get along with and requires minimal care.

     Burmilla At a glance

Weight range:

Male: medium: 8-12 lbs.
Female: medium: 8-12 lbs.

Eye color:

Green

Expectations:

Longevity Range: 7-12 yrs.
Social/Attention Needs: Moderate
Tendency to Shed: Moderate

Coat:

Length: Medium
Characteristics: Smooth
Colors: Black, Blue, Chocolate, Lilac, Caramel, Beige, Apricot
Pattern: Tortoiseshell, Shaded
Less Allergenic: No
Overall Grooming Needs: Moderate

Club recognition:

Cat Association Recognition:
FIFe
Prevalence: Rare


The Burmilla Cat Breed

The Burmilla is rarely seen. In Britain, it is still an experimental breed, and it is not yet accepted by the major registries in the U.S.

The Burmilla is a medium-sized cat, but she is also stocky and heavy. This breed is somewhat compact while being very muscular with heavy boning.

The Burmilla is a cat that is very rounded. The head is round and the tips of the ears are round. The profile shows a "break," and the eyes are very slightly slanted.

The coat of the Burmilla is short and soft. Because of the original pairing, the coat is also thick and dense.

Personality:

The Burmilla is a fairly placid cat. She tends to be an easy cat to get along with, requiring minimal care. The Burmilla is affectionate and sweet and makes a good companion.

Living With:

Burmillas are good climbers and jumpers and should have cat trees and perches. The Burmilla is a sturdy, stocky cat and you might have to watch her weight carefully, particularly if she does not get enough exercise. Modify her nutrition if you need to do so.

While Burmillas are placid cats, they also love their daily playtime. They love being adored by their parents and having their stomach rubbed and being petted. A daily petting session is a must for any Burmilla.

The Burmilla must be brushed daily to remove the loose and dead hairs from the coat. The brushing can be incorporated with her playtime.

History:

The Burmilla started out as an accident. In 1981, a Chinchilla Persian male and a Lilac Burmese bred, and the female delivered four kittens. These kittens had an unusual black-tipped coloring. The look of these cats was so attractive that a breeding program was inaugurated to produce a cat that would have the short hair of the Burmese, the roundness taken from both breeds, and the unusual coloring seen in the initial kittens.

The Burmilla is rarely seen. In Britain, it is still an experimental breed, and it is not yet accepted by the major registries in the United States.